Sijo: Elementals

 

blue whippet looking at sailing boats anchored at Plockton

 

another sailor drops his anchor in the sheltered bay
mountains link around his sanctuary with calm he only feels
the wind blowing through his soul, the waves rolling through his heart

© Xenia Tran

 

sailing boats anchored at Plockton

 

With love from Eivor, Pearl and Xenia xxx

 

Photographs by Xenia Tran, edited in lr.

Camera: Panasonic Lumix FZ200, settings: iA, 1/400 s and Landscape, 1/200 s.

 

For more information about the Sijo form you can visit an earlier post here.

 

Carpe Diem #1234 – Waves (Heydar Aliyev Center, Baku, Azarbaijan by Zaha Hadid)

Daily Post Weekly Photo Challenge: Elemental

dVerse Poets Open Link Night #201

 

Sijo: Wings Of Fur

lr-1080504 ww

sea air and silt stir the surge to lurch into the speed of bliss
your feet kiss the sand in circles where each grain tells a story –
all I can hear is the song in your eyes, the spark in your smile

© Xenia Tran

blue whippet running on the beach

With love from Eivor, Pearl and Xenia xxx

 

Photographs by Xenia Tran, edited in lr.

Camera: Panasonic Lumix FZ200, setting: Action, 1/800 s.

 

dVerse Poets Tuesday Poetics: Sensory Play

(For an explanation of the form and another sijo feel free to read our earlier post ‘Sijo: On The Shore‘ )

Daily Prompt: Radiate

 

Sijo: On The Shore

Two whippets playing between seaweed covered rocks at low tide

the tide sweeps out once more, leaves seaweeds resting in airs of Spring
among the joys of shell and stones, playful dogs and soaring gulls
it takes a while before the poem plucks me from the mountains

© Xenia Tran

Low tide on the Moray Firth

Happy Monday and much love to you all,
from Eivor, Pearl and Xenia xxx

Photographs by Xenia Tran, edited in lr.

Camera: Panasonic Lumix FZ200, setting: iA.

Kristjaan at Carpe Diem invites us to write a Sijo:

More ancient than haiku, the Korean Sijo shares a common ancestry with haiku, tanka and similar Japanese genres. All evolved from more ancient Chinese patterns. Sijo is traditionally composed in three lines of 14-16 syllables each, totalling between 44-46 syllables. A pause breaks each line approximately in the middle. The sijo may be narrative or thematic, introducing a situation or problem in line 1, development or “turn” in line 2, and resolution in line 3. The first half of the final line employs a “twist”: a surprise of meaning, sound, tone or other device. The sijo is often more lyrical, subjective and personal than haiku, and the final line can take a profound, witty, humorous or proverbial turn. Like haiku, sijo has a strong basis in nature.

Carpe Diem Universal Jane #13: Sijo

Daily Post Weekly Photo Challenge: It Is Easy Being Green

dVerse Open Link Night #193